When given the licence to run free with their ideas, designers can very often surprise and delight. Unlike the creations that fashion designers can sometimes present us with, those created by package designers can actually have real world application.

Where you may not be able to envisage yourself wearing a tin foil yacht on your head, surrounded by blue sequins and wireframe dolphins, you could probably see yourself making use of some of the following honey containers.

Bear in mind, some of these are concepts while others are in stores right now. Concept or real world, there is no denying the artistry involved. Enjoy.

Savannah Bee Company Honey Bottles

Student Work – Collin Cummings

Citing the industriousness of the bee, and the timeless quality of the production process, Collin has created something wonderful here. Although it may remind some of specimen containers, it serves to illustrate the almost clinical approach to honey production that bees take.

Honey production hasn’t drastically changed in 100 million years, with the bee evolving in tandem with the flowers that it collects from. For a process to remain relatively changed for so long, a certain clinical approach has to be taken – if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it. Cummings has managed to capture that with the overall shape of the container, the lid and the type face with a nod nature via the materials used to create the lid, and the pattern printed on the inside of the glass. Rendered invisible by the honey when full, the pattern becomes apparent as the honey level goes down.

Foods Cross

Every centimetre of the packaging for Foods Cross Greek honey shouts sophistication, and you wouldn’t expect anything but the very highest quality honey to be waiting inside.

Each container has been individually numbered, suggesting a limited production run and an exclusivity that is sure to attract the discerning purchaser. The labeling is clear and manages to remain uncluttered, despite the abundance of text on the reverse and the large bee image to the front. Leaving the rest of the container clear was a good decision, the rich amber colour of the honey complementing the rest of the packaging perfectly.

Honey Packaging Design – Daria Dahoo

Looking very much like a perfume or premium talc container, the box for this honey is beautifully designed – just like the container actually holding the honey.

Turning the jar reveals a traveller-bee coming into land on the white edelweiss flower, and taking off again with his cargo. We like this one especially, for its simple and understated elegance.

Ballard Bee Company Honey

Clean, clinical and pure. Looking like it just jumped off a periodic table variant, the packaging for Ballard Bee Company honey is clearly meant to denote purity – presented as a basic element.

The company offers a range of honey based products, each styled along similar lines as this pure wildflower honey. A minimalist design such as this works in most kitchens, and you may even want to keep it on the counter where it can be appreciated.

Education Through Design

A very unusual yet ingenious design, this one. From the bee anatomy drawings, designed to educate, to the flower shaped logo and the stylized numbers on each particular blend – the designs on show are refreshingly unique and detailed.

It isn’t too often that our condiments can give us a biology lesson, but a what a welcome one it is!

Abella Honey

The long golden drip on the label leaves you in little doubt as to what the container holds, but the rest of the jar is styled in such a way that the contents could be almost any kitchen essential – or even an exotic face creme.

Abella honey jars are beautifully designed, honey or no, with the reservoir itself shaped so as to give the golden amber contents the appearance of fluidity even as it sits still on the shelf.

Yapira Honey

These Yapira Honey decanters would look right at home at any kitchen or dining table, from an apartment in the city to a rural farmhouse – these crystal flasks are the very embodiment of class, but without the airs and graces that would preclude it from more modest surroundings.

Very simple imagery and text, coupled with a clear container makes for a very attractive piece.

Hexagon Honey

Every once in a while, there comes a package design that is not only beautiful but is also functional too. This marriage of form and function is one that designers strive for, provided that is simple in its execution and is contextually relevant.

With Hexagon Honey, with have a design that nails form and function beautifully. Fitted into the underside of the lid is a more than useful drizzler, cutting out the need for a separate utensil. The unique shape, too, is useful and not simply there to represent honeycombs. Hexagon Honey jars are stackable, making for some truly stunning point of sale displays.

Bzzz Honey

From the functional to the slightly whimsical, with a little nod to Winnie-the-Pooh along the way. Here we have a design that is purely for the aesthetics. Inside the wooden hive lies the honey jar, which uses the top of the hive as its lid.

Pleasing to the eye, this packaging can be dismantled ring by ring – making it easier to lift out the jar should you need to. Sometimes, though , it’s just about looking good and this design for Bzzz Honey is beautiful in a very innocent kind of way.

Package designers can provide some truly unique, useful and beautiful designs when given the freedom to do so. All it takes is a little trust, and the vision to unleash your designer and allow their creativity to run the show – who knows, you may just end up with a unique piece of art as well as a package for your new product.

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